The slime trend oozes into social media

Utica Arrow staff

Each year there are different trends that set that year apart from the others, whether it’s a new dance or a fashion craze. Though slime has been around for decades and the slime videos on social media aren’t new, the slime trend has been rising in popularity in 2017. 

There are many different recipes for slime; each one creates a different combination of colors and textures. For example, some slime is glittery and very slippery, while other kinds of slime have one primary color and are stretchy.

The Arrow Staff made slime using the below instructions from www.homesciencetools.com. Watch the video tutorial here.

What You Need:

  • School glue
  • Borax (Sodium tetraborate)
  • Food coloring (optional)
  • Water
  • Two bowls

What You Do:

  1. In one bowl mix 1 oz. glue (about ¼ of the glue bottle) and ¼ cup water. If you want colored slime, add food coloring to the glue and water mixture. Lift some of the solution out of the container with the stir stick and note what happens.
  2. Add ¼ cup of Sodium Tetraborate (Borax) Solution to the glue and water mixture and stir slowly.
  3. The slime will begin to form immediately. Lift some of the solution with the stir stick and observe how the consistency has changed from Step 1.
  4. Stir as much as you can, then dig in and knead it with your hands until it gets less sticky. This is a messy experience but is necessary because it allows the two compounds to bond completely. Don’t worry about any leftover water in the bowl; just pour it out.
  5. When not in use, store the slime in a plastic bag in the fridge to keep it from growing mold.

Slime is appealing to many because of its vibrant colors. Its popularity has risen due to appealing colors that look interesting in Instagram videos, as well as its pleasant texture that others consider calming. Regardless of the aesthetically-pleasing nature of some slime, not everyone enjoys it.

“I don’t like slime. I don’t like the way it smells,” teacher Taryn Larson said. “I don’t like the feeling on my hands afterwards. I wasn’t a ‘putty’ kid; I liked Play-Doh better than putty.”

It isn’t uncommon for current elementary school students to enjoy making and sometimes even selling slime.

“My sister sells it at school,” sophomore Haley Kelly said. “It’s fun looking up ways to make it.”

Many young people of varying ages have taken to social media to share their slime creations. They’re called “Slimers,” and they post videos of themselves poking and playing with the slime they made. Some popular Instagram “Slimers” are Alyssa J. (@craftyslimecreator) who has 567,000 followers, “satisfactoryfeed“, an account with 556,000 followers, and “wispyslimes“, an account with 190,000 followers. The Instagram accounts “satisfactoryfeed” and “craftyslimecreator” also have shops where people can buy their slime linked to their Instagram accounts.

Students in the hallways and some in the cafeteria had the chance to look at and feel the slime made by Arrow staff members.

“I think it’s pretty cool,” senior Daniel Martinez said. “It’s like clay. I wouldn’t make it at home.”

Other students weren’t as impressed with the slime.

“I think it’s weird,” junior Grant Powell said. “I wouldn’t make it on my own.”

Though he wouldn’t make the slime himself, he does see a purpose to buying slime.

“I’d buy it maybe for stress purposes, like a stress ball,” Powell said. “But that’s about it.”

Most slime sold online ranges from $2 to $1o, depending on the size of the slime and the materials used to create it.

“I’d buy it for $2, probably,” Powell said.

It’s hardly uncommon for students to be stressed, but slime may help students cope with their stress while at home.